Thursday, 7 December 2017

Optical disk development



Optical video recording technology, using a transparent disc, was invented by David Paul Gregg and James Russell in 1958 The Gregg patents were purchased by MCA in 1968. By 1969, Philips had developed a videodisc in reflective mode, which has advantages over the transparent mode. MCA and Philips then decided to combine their efforts and first publicly demonstrated the video disc in 1972.
Although the format was capable of offering higher-quality video and audio than its consumer rivals, VHS and Betamax videotape, LaserDisc never managed to gain widespread use in North America, largely due to high costs for the players and video titles themselves and the inability to record TV programs. It was not a popular format in Europe and Australia when first released, but eventually did gain traction in these regions to become popular in the 1990s. By contrast, the format was much more popular in Japan and in the more affluent regions of Southeast Asia, such as Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia. Its superior video and audio quality made it a popular choice among videophiles and film enthusiasts during its lifespan.

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